How neurotechnology could help treat dyslexia (Wired UK)

“When [a non-dyslexic] looks at a sentence, their brain sees the words are spaced correctly. What lands on the eye of a dyslexic person is exactly the same – it’s in the brain that this is broken up improperly, so you get a perception of the words in a way that isn’t orderly and doesn’t make sense, which makes it challenging to read,” said Donoghue.

“[Researchers at the University of Geneva] found that we have a rhythm in the language centre of our brains, a kind of hum of the brain. Some people think it’s like the idling of your car, but it’s been hypothesised that in fact this might be the rhythm that helps us break up our words into phonemes, or pieces that make sense to us.”

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Dyslexic student who can’t learn French hits bilingualism barrier at university

“Lewicki would like to take the one course required in French in English instead, or have the university provide a translator, but he says “they’re insistent that they will not support any form of accommodation.” He says a university official suggested that he apply to another program that is “less stringent on bilingualism.”

“They can say, ‘Go somewhere else,'” says Lewicki. “But turning someone away because of a disability and saying, ‘There are other options,’ is still discrimination. If you turn someone away from your store because of the colour of their skin, or their gender, or identity, that’s still discrimination, even if there’s a store next door that would take them.”

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Understanding Dyslexia and the Reading Brain in Kids

“Wolf, who has a dyslexic son, is on a mission to spread the idea of “cerebrodiversity,” the idea that our brains are not uniform and we each learn differently. Yet when it comes to school, students with different brains can often have lives filled with frustration and anguish as they, and everyone around them, struggle to figure out what is wrong with them.”

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Free Guide Assistive Technology

“There was so much that I wanted to express in my writing and in my exams, and so much that I wanted to explore with reading, and yet, I felt at the time, trapped in a big glass box of my #dyslexia. And then, I began to *truly* understand how to use assistive technology, and for the first time in my life, I began to experience true flourishing.. That’s why I’ve put together a FREE interactive PDF guide on using Assistive Technology as a dyslexic student”

Click on the link below to access a copy of the free PDF guide!

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Dyslexic entrepreneurs – why they have a competitive edge

““Dyslexic entrepreneurs reported as good or excellent at oral communication, delegation, creative and spatial awareness tasks, whilst non-dyslexics reported as average or good,” Logan says. People with dyslexia, she found, tend to compensate for things they can’t do well by developing excellence in other areas: oral communication, delegation (because they must learn to trust other people with tasks they can’t do from an early age), as well as problem-solving and people management.”

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New primary school tests discriminate against dyslexic pupils, say teachers

“For many years, I have encouraged children to develop their vocabulary in their writing, urging them to be creative and ambitious with their word choices. Now this ambition must be curbed as teachers will be encouraging their pupils to use only words they can spell correctly … Those children with SEND [special education needs and disabilities] who have flair, creativity and write with a strong authorial voice will be deemed as not ready for secondary. This seems discriminatory…In the old system, the majority of marks were about composition. That’s just vanished. Now we are having to tell kids to forget about ambitious vocabulary, because it’s all about accuracy. So use ‘bad’ instead of ‘disastrous’, because you can spell it.”

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