Dyslexia and Me: Dyslexia at Work

“When I went for my interview for my current job I told the interviewer that I’m dyslexic. For me that is a massive step! And to be honest, I wouldn’t have done it if it hadn’t been for this blog and the support I’ve had from readers. It’s given me extra determination to stand up for my rights. When I started I made sure I told the people training me that I’m dyslexic and the support I had through college and university after they mentioned that the company support people of all backgrounds, including people with dyslexia. I wasn’t sure how to tell them, but they mentioned dyslexia and I knew that was my way in to approach the subject.”

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Source: thedyslexicstudent.wordpress.com

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Why Every Company Should Hire A Dyslexic Person

“Straight forward and logical tasks are probably not a dyslexics favourite past time. But we are very good at thinking outside the box. No amount of training can teach someone to think out of the box. It’s a skill you’re born with. Companies that think different go further.”

“Dyslexics are naturally disorganised so we over compensate. Diaries, clocks, watches and calendars are a few of our favourite things. We know how easy it is to drop the ball on bad days so we work very hard to make sure that never happens. It really does work.”
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Source: josefkonderla.wordpress.com

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5 Ways to Respond (Well) to Your Child’s Dyslexia Diagnosis

“My daughter was diagnosed as dyslexic at the end of second grade. Since then, I’ve had countless conversations with other parents processing similar news. They find me through word of mouth, I’m often the first non-family member they’ve discussed it with, and over and over again I’ve shared the small but important pieces of wisdom I’ve picked up in the last three years. My advice has less to do with how to treat the learning disability — that’s for experts — and more to do with how you, as a parent, can best serve your child. Some of this advice is intuitive, but a surprising amount isn’t. In the hopes of helping more parents negotiate their own reactions to a dyslexia diagnosis, here are my top five pieces of advice”

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Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

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Dyslexic Lawyer David Boies – The Power Of Dyslexia

“When taking these enormous accomplishments into consideration, one might think that David Boies was successful in school and academics from the onset of preschool and kindergarten, but he has actually struggled with Dyslexia for his entire life. It might seem hard to believe that the man who didn’t learn to read until third grade and who struggled on timed exams and often scored poorly could become one of the nation’s top lawyers representing clients such as Al Gore, the United States Justice Department in its antitrust suit against Microsoft and gay and lesbian clients in a challenge to California’s Proposition 8, which banned same sex marriage. Through hard work and dedication, paired with strategies that help Boies navigate the complex reading tasks required for law school and a career as an attorney, Boies has found a way of becoming one of the most successful professionals in his field despite his life long learning disability.”

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Source: www.thepowerofdyslexia.com

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Assistive Edtech: How Technology Helps Students with Dyslexia

“Education technology is even helping beyond its intended purpose. Online courses offer great alternatives to traditional classrooms because of their use of multimedia. Videos, moving graphs, audio lessons, and pictures are great ways to disseminate information in a way that may be helpful for someone struggling with language processing. Hart mentions using tablets is a good way to offer a multisensory approach to teaching, which is a much easier way for dyslexic students to engage in lessons.”
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Source: edtechtimes.com

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10 Resources to Better Understand Dyslexia

“Imagine trying to read a sentence when every other word looks like made-up gibberish. It’s exhausting to read the sentence over and over again, trying to put together the meaning. That one troublesome sentence is followed by another… and another… and another…You know it’s not your fault – it’s the text doesn’t make sense.

Now imagine that you’re in a room full of your peers, but you’re the only one who seems to be having trouble. You’re sociable, intelligent, and creative, but you’re terrified you’ll be asked to read aloud and anxious you won’t be able to retain the information you need to.”

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Source: www.edudemic.com

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To Whom Much is Given…

“Now, he is a senior in high school, and other than the ACT struggle, he is hitting his stride.  He is dual enrolled in college English and getting an A (although his first drafts are grammatically horrifying, he and his GINGER software are working well together). He audits a Developmental Psychology class from a nearby University and HAS THE HIGHEST AVERAGE IN THE CLASS!”

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Source: twmig.blogspot.fr

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